What does LGBTQIA+ mean?

LGBTQIA+ is an acronym (initialism) that stands for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, Intersex and Asexual, with the + covering related communities. It is intended to emphasize the diversity of sexuality and gender identity-based cultures, by encompassing spectrums of sexuality and gender.

It has become adopted into the mainstream as an umbrella term for use when labelling topics pertaining to sexuality and gender identity.

Why is the Pride flag a rainbow?

The Rainbow Pride Flag is arguably the most famous and universal symbol of the LGBT+ community, and its colours are intended to reflect the diversity of the community itself.

Before its adopted worldwide, the flag originated in the San Francisco Bay Area of Northern California, having been devised by local artist Gilbert Baker following a challenge by politician Harvey Milk to create a symbol of pride for the community.

Although there is much debate on the inspiration for the rainbow colour scheme, with some placing the root of the idea in the hippie movement influenced by Allen Ginsberg. Nonetheless, Baker composed the eight stripped flag and assigned each colour with a specific meaning.

Image 4 - Flag & Colours.PNG
Image 5 - Flag & Colours.PNG

When was the Centre founded?

The Centre we know today, was originally founded in 1976 as the Leicester Help Line and it wasn’t until 2010 that the Centre became a registered charity under the moniker the Leicester LGBT Centre.

Timeline highlighting key points and moments of the Centre’s history.

What available support groups are at the Centre?

The Centre runs a number of social and support groups that cater to the LGBTQIA+ community.

A full list can be found on our Groups Page.

While our more popular run groups held here at the Centre, include:

Living Out Loud

The Centre’s social and support group for individuals who identify as transgender or who are questioning their gender identity over the age of 18 years.

All meetings are held at the Centre (15 Wellington Street, LE1 6HH), on the first and third Wednesday of each month, from 06:00 PM to 08:00 PM.

The group is free to attend, and you do not need to book in advance.

If you have any questions, please do email us.

T-Party

The Centre’s social and support group for young people aged between 13 and 19 years, who are trans, non-binary or questioning their gender identity.

All meetings are held at the Centre (15 Wellington Street, LE1 6HH), every Monday each week, from 06:00 PM to 08:00 PM.

The group is free to attend, and you do not need to book in advance.

If you have any questions, please do email us.

Misfits

The Centre’s social and support group for all LGBT+ young adults, aged between 18 to 30 years.

All meetings are held at the Centre (15 Wellington Street, LE1 6HH), on the second and fourth Wednesday of each month, from 07:00 PM to 09:00 PM.

The group is free to attend, and you do not need to book in advance.

1st Out

The Centre’s social and support group for all LGBT+ young people, aged between 13 and 19 years, who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender or are questioning their sexuality or gender identity.

All meetings are held at the Centre (15 Wellington Street, LE1 6HH), every Thursday each week, from 07:00 PM to 09:00 PM.

The group is free to attend, and you do not need to book in advance.

When is Leicester Pride?

Leicester Pride is the annual LGBT Pride event that takes place in the summer each year, and includes a large parade (with more than 2,000 people) through Leicester’s city centre and a festival at Victoria Park, which is attended by more than 10,000.

The event is family friendly and suitable for all ages, with a starting time of 12 Noon for the beginning of the city parade that leads to the festival site at 1 PM.

The yearly event was inaugurated in 2001, with support by Arts Council England, and the most recent pride was on the 1st September 2018.

Pride for 2019 is currently underway with preparations, with a date awaiting announcement.

Parade route for Leicester Pride, starting outside the Curve Theatre on Rutland Street at 12.00 noon and heading through the city centre, before making its way to the Leicester Pride Festival site at Victoria Park by around 1:00 PM.

Where does the United Kingdom stand on LGBT Rights?

The rights of the LGBT community in the United Kingdom have increasingly strengthened since the dawn of the 21st Century, with discrimination protections originating in 1999 being extended immensely with the Equality Act 2010.

Key changes have included:

  • 12/01/2000: Removal of the ban on LGBT individuals openly serving in Her Majesty’s Armed Forces, through the European Court of Human Rights’ Smith and Grady v UK (1999) 29 EHRR 493 Case.

  • 21/06/2000: Repeal of Section 28 in Scotland by the Ethical Standards in Public Life etc. (Scotland) Act 2000, one of the first pieces of legislation enacted by the new Scottish Parliament. It would not be until 18/11/2003 in the rest of the United Kingdom by Section 122 of the Local Government Act 2003.

  • 08/01/2001: The equalisation of the age of consent to 16 years old in England, Scotland and Wales through the Sexual Offences (Amendment) Act 2000. It was not until 2009, that the age of consent was lowered to 16 years old in Northern Ireland through the Sexual Offences (Northern Ireland) Order 2008, as it had previously been 17 years regardless of sexual orientation.

  • 04/04/2005: Transgender individuals gain the right to change their legal gender, as per the Gender Recognition Act 2004.

  • 30/12/2005: Same-sex couples were granted the legal right to enter into civil partnerships, holding to the same legal structure as marriage, with the addition to joint and stepchild adoption in England and Wales, under the Civil Partnership Act 2004. Adoption rights for same-sex couples were extended to Scotland in 28/09/2009 through The Adoption and Children (Scotland) Act 2007 (Commencement No. 4, Transitional and Savings Provisions) Order 2009, and Northern Ireland in 11/12/2013 following the Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission, Re Judicial Review (2012).

The Crown Dependencies eventually adopted the law at varying intervals:

  • 02/04/2011 – Isle of Man through the Civil Partnership Act 2011.

  • 02/04/2012 – Jersey through the Civil Partnership (Jersey) Law 2012.

  • 03/04/2017 – Guernsey through the Population Management Law 2016.

The British Overseas Territories (BOTs) eventually adopted the law at varying intervals:

  • 28/03/2014 – Gibraltar through the Civil Partnership Act 2014.

  • 03/02/2015 – Bermuda through the Adoption of Children Act 2015.

  • 15/05/2015 – Pitcairn Islands through the Adoption of Infants Ordinance 2015.

  • 01/01/2017 – Ascension Island through the Marriage (Ascension) (Commencement) Order, 2016.

  • 30/03/2017 – Falkland Islands through the Marriage Bill 2017.

  • 04/08/2017 – Tristan da Cunha through the Marriages (Tristan da Cunha) Ordinance, 2017.

  • 06/10/2017 – Saint Helena through the Marriage Bill 2017.

However, it should be noted that the following BOTs have not adopted this law; Anguilla, the British Antarctic Territory, the British Indian Ocean Territory, the British Virgin Islands, the Cayman Islands, Montserrat, South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands, as well as the Turks and Caicos Islands.

  • 10/12/2014: The legislation of same-sex marriage in England, Wales and Scotland through the Marriage (Same Sex Couples) Act 2013. However, it continues to be recognised sorely as a civil partnership in Northern Ireland.

The UK has been rated highly on the international stage for its stance on LGBT rights. In the 2015 review of LGBTI rights, ILGA-Europe gave the UK the highest score in Europe, with an 86% progress toward “respect of human rights and full equality” for LGBT people, and a 92% score for Scotland alone.

While a 2013 poll conducted by the think-tank Pew Research Center, found that 76% of the United Kingdom believe homosexuality should be accepted fully by society.

Further, following the 2017 General Election, the United Kingdom gained the world record for having the most openly out LGBTI individuals holding seats in the 57th Parliament of Westminster, with forty-five openly out LGBTI Members of Parliament (MPs) elected.

How many LGBT people are there in the United Kingdom?

Although Stonewall has held the conclusion that, it is statistically difficult to define the LGBT population of the United Kingdom, as it must be accounted that not everyone is openly out.

Nonetheless, in 2010 the Integrated Household Survey made estimates that 1.5% of the population of the United Kingdom identify as LGB. While YouGov has decried such studies as underestimating the true population number, as the face-to-face methodology used does not account for those unwilling to disclose their sexual orientation, and instead proposes the proportion is 7% of the population identity as LGB, while the trans population stands between 300,000 and 500,000 people.

What was Section 28?

Section 28 of the Local Government Act 1988, was an amendment made to the United Kingdom’s Local Government Act 1986, on the 24th May 1988. The amendment imposed onto local authorities stated that they …

“shall not intentionally promote homosexuality or publish material with the intention of promoting homosexuality" or "promote the teaching in any maintained school of the acceptability of homosexuality as a pretended family relationship".

In practice this resulted in a prohibition of local councils from distributing any material, whether plays, leaflets, books, etc., that portrayed gay relationships as anything other than abnormal. Further, educational staff were unable to discuss gay issues with students for fear of losing state funding.

The Scottish Parliament eventually repealed it on the 21st June 2000 through the Ethical Standards in Public Life etc. (Scotland) Act 2000, and the UK Parliament did so on the 18th November 2003 by Section 122 of the Local Government Act 2003.

Prominent individuals who spoke out for the repeal of Section 28 included Sir Ian McKellen, Baron Michael Cashman, Ivan Massow, Mo Mowlam, Simon Callow, Annette Crosbie, Michael Mansfield QC, Dame Helen Mirren, Frank Miller, Neil Gaiman, and Alan Moore. Among notable others.

Where can I get a free and confidential sexual health check in Leicester?

 You are able to order an online test kit through the Leicester Sexual Health (NHS) website, these tests are free, delivered via discreet postal service (they will fit through most letterboxes) and you will receive your results via email or text.

The following test are available to order:

There are also a number of clinics within the city that are available … [Coming Soon]

Are there any famous LGBT Brits?

The definition of sexual orientation has changed greatly over time and the words “lesbian”, "gay", “bisexual” and “trans” were not used to describe sexual orientation until the mid 20th Century. Nonetheless, the British Isles have produced a number of famous LGBT individuals, which have included, but is not limited to, the following:

Freddie Mercury, Sir Ian McKellen, Alan Turing, Graham Chapman, Kenneth Williams, John Maynard Keynes, Justin Fashanu, E.M. Forster, Rob Halford, Noel Coward, Clive Barker, Wilfred Owen, A.E. Housman, John Curry, James Whale, Siegfried Sassoon, and Carol Ann Duffy, etc.

 

Glossary of terms & DEFINITIONS

There exists a number of terms used both by and for the LGBTQIA+ community, with many acronyms in various presentations or discussions to describe the community. Admittedly, many of which can be daunting for those new to the community to understand, thus the Centre hopes this glossary will be of some help.

It should be noted that this list is neither comprehensive nor inviolable, as the diversity of sexuality and gender identity-based cultures, which encompass spectrums of sexuality and gender, are constantly evolving. Thus, this list will receive regular updates and amendments.

A

  • Advocate: A person who actively works to end intolerance, educate others, and support social equity for a marginalized group.

  • Agender: A person with no (or very little) connection to the traditional system of gender, no personal alignment with the concepts of either man or woman, and/or someone who sees themselves as existing without gender.

  • Ally: Typically a straight and/or cisgender person who supports and respects members of the LGBTQIA+ community.

  • Androgyny / Androgynous: A gender expression that has elements of both masculinity and femininity.

  • Androsexual / Androphilic: Being primarily sexually, romantically and/or emotionally attracted to some men, males, and/or masculinity.

  • Aromantic: Experiencing little or no romantic attraction to others and/or has a lack of interest in romantic relationships/behaviour.

  • Asexual: Experiencing little or no sexual attraction to others and/or a lack of interest in sexual relationships/behaviour. Asexuality is different from celibacy in that it is a sexual orientation whereas celibacy is an abstaining from a certain action.

  • Assigned Male At Birth (AMAB): A phrase used to intentionally recognize a person’s assigned sex (not gender identity). 

  • Assigned Female At Birth (AFAB): A phrase used to intentionally recognize a person’s assigned sex (not gender identity). 

B

  • Bigender: A person who fluctuates between traditionally “woman” and “man” gender-based behavior and identities, identifying with both genders (and sometimes a third gender).

  • Bicurious: A curiosity about having attraction to people of the same gender/sex.

  • Biological Sex: A medical term used to refer to the chromosomal, hormonal and anatomical characteristics that are used to classify an individual as female or male or intersex.

  • Biphobia: A range of negative attitudes (e.g., fear, anger, intolerance, invisibility, resentment, erasure, or discomfort) that one may have or express towards bisexual individuals. Biphobia can come from and be seen within the LGBTQ community as well as straight society.

  • Bisexual: A person who is emotionally, physically, and/or sexually attracted to people of their gender and another gender . This attraction does not have to be equally split or indicate a level of interest that is the same across the genders or sexes an individual may be attracted to.

  • Butch: A person who identifies themselves as masculine, whether it be physically, mentally or emotionally. ‘Butch’ is sometimes used as a derogatory term for lesbians, but is also be claimed as an affirmative identity label.

C

  • Cisgender: A person whose gender identity and biological sex assigned at birth align (e.g., man and assigned male at birth).

  • Cissexism: Behaviour that grants preferential treatment to cisgender people, reinforces the idea that being cisgender is somehow better or more “right” than being transgender, and/or makes other genders invisible.

  • Cisnormativity: The assumption, in individuals or in institutions, that everyone is cisgender, and that cisgender identities are superior to trans identities or people.

  • Closeted: An individual who is not open to themselves or others about their (queer) sexuality or gender identity. This may be by choice and/or for other reasons such as fear for one’s safety, peer or family rejection or disapproval and/or loss of housing, job, etc.

  • Coming Out: The process by which one accepts and/or comes to identify one’s own sexuality or gender identity. It can also refer to the process by which one shares one’s sexuality or gender identity with others.

  • Constellation: A way to describe the arrangement or structure of a polyamorous relationship.  

  • Cross-Dresser: Someone who wears clothes of another gender/sex.

D

  • Demiromantic: Little or no capacity to experience romantic attraction until a strong sexual or emotional connection is formed with another individual, often within a sexual relationship.

  • Demisexual: Little or no capacity to experience sexual attraction until a strong romantic or emotional connection is formed with another individual, often within a romantic relationship.

  • Down Low: Typically referring to men who identify as straight but who secretly have sex with men. Down low (or DL) originated in, and is most commonly used by communities of colour.

  • Drag King: Someone who performs masculinity theatrically.

  • Drag Queen: Someone who performs femininity theatrically.

  • Dyke: Referring to a masculine presenting lesbian. While often used derogatorily, it can is adopted affirmatively by many lesbians (both more masculine and more feminine presenting lesbians  not necessarily masculine ones) as a positive self-identity term.

  • DSG: A shorthand or umbrella term for all folks who have a non-normative (or queer) gender or sexuality, there are many different initialisms people prefer. DSG is Diverse Sexualities and Genders.

  • Designated Sex At Birth (DSAB): A phrase used to intentionally recognize a person’s assigned sex (not gender identity). 

E

  • Emotional Attraction: A capacity that evokes the want to engage in romantic intimate behavior (e.g., sharing, confiding, trusting, inter-depending), experienced in varying degrees (from little-to-none, to intense).

F

  • Feminine-of-Centre: A word that indicates a range of terms of gender identity and gender presentation for folks who present, understand themselves, and/or relate to others in a more feminine way, but don’t necessarily identify as women.  Feminine-of-centre individuals may also identify as femme, submissive, transfeminine, etc.

  • Feminine-Presenting: A way to describe someone who expresses gender in a more feminine way. Often confused with feminine-of-centre, which generally include a focus on identity as well as expression.

  • Femme: Someone who identifies themselves as feminine, whether it be physically, mentally or emotionally. Often used to refer to a feminine-presenting queer woman.

  • Fluid(ity): Generally with another term attached, like gender-fluid or fluid-sexuality, fluid(ity) describes an identity that may change or shift over time between or within the mix of the options available (e.g., man and woman, bi and straight).

  • FtM / F2M: Abbreviation for a female-to-male transgender or transsexual person.

G

  • Gay: Individuals who are primarily emotionally, physically, and/or sexually attracted to members of the same sex and/or gender. More commonly used when referring to men who are attracted to other men, but can be applied to women as well.

  • Gender Binary: The idea that there are only two genders and that every person is one of those two.

  • Gender Expression: The external display of one’s gender, through a combination of dress, demeanor, social behavior, and other factors, generally made sense of on scales of masculinity and femininity. 

  • Gender Fluid: A gender identity best described as a dynamic mix of boy and girl. A person who is gender fluid may always feel like a mix of the two traditional genders, but may feel more man some days, and more woman other days.

  • Gender Identity: The internal perception of an one’s gender, and how they label themselves, based on how much they align or don’t align with what they understand their options for gender to be.

  • Gender Non-Conforming: A gender expression descriptor that indicates a non-traditional gender presentation (masculine woman or feminine man).

  • Gender Normative / Gender Straight: Someone whose gender presentation, whether by nature or by choice, aligns with society’s gender-based expectations.

  • Genderqueer: A gender identity label often used by people who do not identify with the binary of man/woman; or as an umbrella term for many gender non-conforming or non-binary identities.

  • Gender Variant: Someone who either by nature or by choice does not conform to gender-based expectations of society (e.g. transgender, transsexual, intersex, gender-queer, cross-dresser, etc). Being primarily sexually, romantically and/or emotionally attracted to some woman, females, and/or femininity.

  • Gynesexual / Gynephilic: Being primarily sexually, romantically and/or emotionally attracted to some woman, females, and/or femininity.

  • GSM: A shorthand or umbrella term for all folks who have a non-normative (or queer) gender or sexuality, there are many different initialisms people prefer. GSM is Gender and Sexual Minorities.

H

  • Heteronormativity: The assumption, in individuals or in institutions, that everyone is heterosexual (e.g. asking a woman if she has a boyfriend) and that heterosexuality is superior to all other sexualities. Leads to invisibility and stigmatizing of other sexualities. Heteronormativity also leads us to assume that only masculine men and feminine women are straight.

  • Hermaphrodite: An outdated medical term previously used to refer to someone who was born with some combination of typically-male and typically-female sex characteristics. It’s considered stigmatizing and inaccurate. 

  • Heterosexism: Behavior that grants preferential treatment to heterosexual people, reinforces the idea that heterosexuality is somehow better or more “right” than queerness, and/or makes other sexualities invisible.

  • Heterosexual: A person primarily emotionally, physically, and/or sexually attracted to members of the opposite sex. Also known as straight.

  • Homophobia: An umbrella term for a range of negative attitudes (e.g., fear, anger, intolerance, resentment, erasure, or discomfort) that one may have towards members of LGBTQ community. The term can also connote a fear, disgust, or dislike of being perceived as LGBTQ. Homophobic – adj. : a word used to describe an individual who harbors some elements of this range of negative attitudes towards gay people.

  • Homosexual: A person primarily emotionally, physically, and/or sexually attracted to members of the same sex/gender. This medical term is considered stigmatizing (particularly as a noun) due to its history as a category of mental illness, and is discouraged for common use (use gay or lesbian instead).

I

  • Intersex: A term for a combination of chromosomes, gonads, hormones, internal sex organs, and genitals that differs from the two expected patterns of male or female. Formerly known as hermaphrodite (or hermaphroditic), but these terms are now outdated and derogatory.

J

No known terms under this initial. Do let us know if you are aware of any.

K

No known terms under this initial. Do let us know if you are aware of any.

L

  • Lesbian: Women who have the capacity to be attracted romantically, erotically, and/or emotionally to some other women.

  • LGBTQ: A shorthand or umbrella term for all folks who have a non-normative (or queer) gender or sexuality, there are many different initialisms people prefer. LGBTQ is Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender and Queer and/or Questioning (sometimes people at a + at the end in an effort to be more inclusive).

  • Lipstick Lesbian: Usually refers to a lesbian with a feminine gender expression. Can be used in a positive or a derogatory way. Is sometimes also used to refer to a lesbian who is assumed to be (or passes for) straight.

M

  • Masculine-of-Centre: A word that indicates a range of terms of gender identity and gender presentation for folks who present, understand themselves, and/or relate to others in a more masculine way, but don’t necessarily identify as men.  Masculine-of-center individuals may also often identify as butch, stud, aggressive, boi, transmasculine, etc.

  • Masculine-Presenting: A way to describe someone who expresses gender in a more masculine way. Often confused with masculine-of-centre, which generally include a focus on identity as well as expression.

  • MtF / M2F: Abbreviation for a male-to-female transgender or transsexual person.

  • Metrosexual: A man with a strong aesthetic sense who spends more time, energy, or money on his appearance and grooming than is considered gender normative.

  • MSM: An abbreviation for men who have sex with men, to distinguish sexual behaviors from sexual identities.

  • Mx: An honorific (just like Mr., Ms., Mrs., etc.) that is gender neutral.  It is often the option of choice for folks who do not identify within the gender binary.

N

  • Non-Binary: Existing or identifying outside the sex/gender binary, being neither a man nor a woman, or being only partially or a combination of these things.

O

  • Outing: Involuntary or unwanted disclosure of another person’s sexual orientation, gender identity, or intersex status.

P

  • Pansexual: A person who experiences sexual, romantic, physical, and/or spiritual attraction for members of all gender identities/expressions. Often shortened to “pan.”

  • Passing: Referring to trans people being accepted as, or able to “pass for” a member of their self-identified gender identity, regardless of sex assigned at birth, without being identified as trans. It can also refer to an LGB/Queer individual who is believed to be or perceived as straight.

  • PGPs: An abbreviation for Preferred Gender Pronouns. Often used during introductions, becoming more common in educational institutions. Many suggest removing the “preferred,” because it indicates flexibility and/or the power for the speaker to decide which pronouns to use for someone else.

  • Polyamory / Polyamorous: Referring to the practice of, desire to, or orientation towards having ethically, honest, and consensual non-monogamous relationships (i.e. relationships that may include multiple partners).

  • Polyfidelity: Referring to the practice of more than two people being in romantic and/or sexual relationships which is not open to additional partners.

Q

  • Queer: Used as an umbrella term to describe individuals who don’t identify as straight. Also used to describe people who have a non-normative gender identity, or as a political affiliation.

  • Questioning: An individual who or time when someone is unsure about or exploring their own sexual orientation or gender identity.

  • QPOC: An abbreviation and initialism that stands for Queer People of Colour.

  • QTPOC: An abbreviation and initialism that stands for Queer and/or Trans People of Colour.

R

  • Romantic Attraction: A capacity that evokes the want to engage in romantic intimate behavior (e.g., dating, relationships, marriage), experienced in varying degrees (from little-to-none, to intense).

S

  • Same Gender Loving (SGL): Sometimes used by some members of the African-American or Black community to express an non-straight sexual orientation without relying on terms and symbols of European descent.

  • Sex Assigned At Birth (SAAB): A phrase used to intentionally recognize a person’s assigned sex (not gender identity). 

  • Sex Coercively Assigned At Birth (SCAB): A phrase used to intentionally recognize a person’s assigned sex (not gender identity). 

  • Sexual Attraction: A capacity that evokes the want to engage in physical intimate behavior (e.g., kissing, touching, intercourse), experienced in varying degrees (from little-to-none, to intense).

  • Sexual Orientation: The type of sexual, romantic, emotional/spiritual attraction one has the capacity to feel for some others, generally labeled based on the gender relationship between the person and the people they are attracted to.

  • Sexual Preference: The types of sexual intercourse, stimulation, and gratification one likes to receive and participate in.

  • Sex Reassignment Surgery (SRS): Used by some medical professionals to refer to a group of surgical options that alter a person’s biological sex.

  • Skoliosexual: Being primarily sexually, romantically and/or emotionally attracted to some genderqueer, transgender, transsexual, and/or non-binary people.

  • Stealth: A trans person who is not “out” as trans, and is perceived by others as cisgender.

  • Stud: Most commonly used to indicate a Black/African-American and/or Latina masculine lesbian/queer woman.

T

  • Third Gender: For a person who does not identify with either man or woman, but identifies with another gender.

  • Top Surgery: This term refers to surgery for the construction of a male-type chest or breast augmentation for a female-type chest.

  • Trans: An umbrella term covering a range of identities that transgress socially defined gender norms.

  • Transgender: A person who lives as a member of a gender other than that assigned at birth based on anatomical sex.

  • Transition / Transitioning: This term is primarily used to refer to the process a trans person undergoes when changing their bodily appearance either to be more congruent with the gender/sex they feel themselves to be and/or to be in harmony with their preferred gender expression.

  • Transman: An identity label sometimes adopted by female-to-male transgender people or transsexuals to signify that they are men while still affirming their history as assigned female sex at birth. 

  • Transwoman: An identity label sometimes adopted by male-to-female transsexuals or transgender people to signify that they are women while still affirming their history as assigned male sex at birth.

  • Transphobia: The fear of, discrimination against, or hatred of trans people, the trans community, or gender ambiguity.

  • Transsexual: A person who identifies psychologically as a gender/sex other than the one to which they were assigned at birth.

  • Transvestite: A person who dresses as the binary opposite gender expression (“cross-dresses”) for any one of many reasons, including relaxation, fun, and sexual gratification.

  • Two-Spirit: An umbrella term, usable only by and for Native American people, it is intended to recognize individuals who possess qualities or fulfill roles of both genders.

  • They / Them: People who are not comfortable/do not embrace he/she use the plural pronoun “they/their” as a gender neutral singular pronoun.

U

No known terms under this initial. Do let us know if you are aware of any.

V

No known terms under this initial. Do let us know if you are aware of any.

W

  • WSW: An abbreviation for women who have sex with women, to distinguish sexual behaviors from sexual identities.

X

No known terms under this initial. Do let us know if you are aware of any.

Y

No known terms under this initial. Do let us know if you are aware of any.

Z

  • Ze / Zir: An alternate set of pronouns that are gender neutral and preferred by some trans* people. They replace “he” and “she” and “his” and “hers” respectively.

Symbolism

There exist a number of symbols that have been used by the LGBTQIA+ community as a means of self-identification, so as to demonstrate unity, pride, shared values, and allegiance to one another.

Below you will find a list of such symbols, including and beyond the two most recognised international symbols of the Pink Triangle and the Rainbow Flag.

It should be noted that this list is neither comprehensive nor inviolable, as the diversity of sexuality and gender identity-based cultures, which encompass spectrums of sexuality and gender, are constantly evolving. Thus, this list will receive regular updates and amendments.

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